Robert William Andrew Feller (1918-2010)

The Indians mourn the passing at age 92 of our greatest pitcher, a treasured American and a friend to all: Bob Feller. In 18 seasons for Cleveland, “Rapid Robert” was 266-162, led the American League in strikeouts seven times, was named to eight All-Star teams and issed three-plus seasons during the prime of his career while serving in World War II.
He is our leader in wins, innings (3,827), strikeouts (2,581), complete games (279) and starts (484). He threw the only Opening Day no-hitter, led us to the title in 1948, saw his No. 19 jersey retired in 1957 and was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1962.
“We in Cleveland have been blessed to have had him with us these many years,” Indians owner Larry Dolan said. “We will never let his memory pass.”
The Indians invite you to share that memory of Bob with others in this time of sadness. Please feel free to leave your condolences and any treasured stories and thoughts below in comments.

95 Comments

I met Bob Feller a few years ago. A real gentleman, and a true class act. He really didn’t want to talk baseball but was telling stories of his time in the navy. A war hero, a hall of famer and an advocate for players rights. I am a Yankee fan but just last week I bought a Bob Feller Indians jersey out of the respect which I have for this man.

Rest in peace, Bob. Even to my generation, you are one of the all time greats.

We have lost a great American and a pitcher that players still emulate today, on and off of the field. God bless those of you who love him the most. You are most certainly in our prayers. Rest in peace now, your work here is done.

In 2007, my friends Dave and Jason and I went down to Florida for Spring Training as part of Dave?s bachelor party. We caught several games that weekend, but at one of them, we were treated to the site pictured above. This is Bob Feller, then age 89, warming up on the sidelines. We stood and watched as he threw to the ballboy for a good 5-10 minutes. Feller still had the motion down, and still put a bit of zip on the ball.

After the warmups, he?d head down the third base line to a table where he?d sit for the rest of the game, signing autographs for a small contribution to the Bob Feller Museum. He?d talk about baseball, or about anything, really. The man was a living legend, but didn?t rope himself off from the game. Instead, he lived within it, front and center.

I smiled as we walked past, and waved at Bob. He gave me a nod and went back to talking with the girl in line at the table, who was having her softball mitt signed.

Spring Training won?t be the same without Bob throwing along the sidelines this year. My thoughts are with all my Tribe-loving friends tonight. Feller was the best that America had to offer in so many ways. He was a patriot, he was a sports hero, he was a wizened old advisor, and a living symbol of that which made the game great.

You will have a place in my heart always, Bob.

Tom Bridge, Editor in Chief
We Love DC

I never met the guy, but I’ve read about his great career and how much he sacrificed serving our country during World War II. For a guy that in the prime of his career and 35 wins in a year wasn’t out of the norm, we’d be talking about possibly 370 career wins and would no doubt be mentioned among the best pitchers not only in Indians history, but in league history. Thank you, Mr. Feller for everything you’ve done for the United States and the game of baseball. I wish nothing but the best for his family, friends, and everyone who knew him.

God bless.

-zach

RIP Rapid Robert.

As a Yankee fan, I was only 10 years old for his last season, but remembered how terrific he was. I would like to see the Hall of Fame place 5 stars over his induction (along with other players like Ted Williams) who honorably served their country during war time. They gave up many years of prime time playing time. They should be the cream of the crop of all Hall of Famers.

The first time I met Bob was after a ball game in Cleveland Municipal Stadium. My friend & I were walking down the ramp when I saw Bob talking to Gabe Paul. We waited until they were finished talking & I went up to Bob & asked him to sign my program, which he did gladly! I told Bob that I lived in Waterloo, Iowa. Of course that interested Bob – someone from Iowa in Cleveland to watch the Indians! Bob told me that he would be in Waterloo the next month for a Waterloo Indians ball game & that I should come out to a game when he was there. The Waterloo Indians club was a single A farm club for the Tribe at the time. Bob was gracious & friendly! I was so excited to meet him! The last time I saw Bob was when he was 90, at Goodyear, Arizona. My wife & I were attending a pre-season ball game & Bob was there signing autographs! I took a picture of my wife standing so that I could see Bob standing in the background of the photo, right after the Star Spangled Banner! In between those two times, I saw Bob at Spring Press Tours, getting his autograph on my favorite baseball card – a 1954 Bowman!

Bob was a wonderful man, a true gentleman and a tribute to his beloved sport of baseball. He is a legend and will be sorely missed. Rest in peace Bob.

A great pitcher. Ahead of his time advocating players rights.
RIP Bob.
http://wrigleyregular.mlblogs.com/

As I die-hard Cleveland Indians fan; I am so saddened and upset today at the passing of Mr. Feller. I met Mr. Feller at spring training at Hi Corbett Field in the early 80’s and again had the pleasure to meet and speak with him again at spring training in Goodyear in ’09 and ’10. He was a gentleman and took time to chat with everyone who approached him, shook hands, took pictures and even gave the ladies a little hug. He’d chat about baseball “back in the day.” His numbers were amazing, especially considering he took 4 years out of his career to serve time in the Navy. He was a true American Hero, Legend and Icon. He could be seen at many Tribe ballgames and functions. Not only has the Indians’ organization lost one of its best, but Major League Baseball has lost one of the best pitchers in baseball history. RIP, Bob Feller; you were a true class act. You will be missed.

I am sitting here in San Diego looking at the program from the Ursuline College Scholarship Gala – Linedrives & Lipstick: The Untold Story of Women in Baseball from September 16, 2010. I was a guest at the event and upon entering the reception area I immediately saw Mr. Feller sitting at a table. I’ve never asked for an autograph in my 64 years, but felt compelled to introduce myself, shake his hand and thank him for his service to our country while in the U.S. Navy as well as his baseball career. He spoke with me for approximately 15 minutes, reached for my pen and found that it wouldn’t write well on the slick program cover. He graciously handed me my faulty pen, reached in his jacket pocket for his own and signed “Best Always – Bob Feller.” He will be the best always.

He was one of the stars on my favorite childhood team. It was only as I grew older that I realized and appreciated his tremendous baseball accomplishments. But even more, I was impressed by his love of country, serving during WWII, and foregoing what was probably his baseball prime. He was such a constant in the lives of we Indians fans….always there, always with an opinion or anecdote on his beloved game of baseball. It is hard to imagine Cleveland baseball without him. Spring Training and Opening day will never be the same. We were lucky to have had him this long. My condolences to his family and to all those Cleveland Indians fans who cherished him. Rest in peace.

Being from Cleveland and spending a lot of time at Cleveland Muni rooting for The Tribe, I saw Bob several times around the stadium and in various places downtown. He has always been my all-time favorite Cleveland Indian, and I can’t think of a better Indian/MLB player who exemplifies the perfect player: the best at his position, role model in every sense of the word off the mound, and a true American hero with his service in WW2. But it wasn’t until I moved to San Diego that I finally had the chance to meet with him. He was signing at a local San Diego memorabilia store. By chance I heard a promo for it on the radio the day before, and my wife and son (then only a toddler) quickly cleared our schedule to go down and meet the Legend. I was a little shocked when we got there and saw that there were only a couple of others who were there. Because of the lack of people, Bob very graciously chatted with us (my family are also huge Tribe/Feller fans) and he even simulated a game of ‘catch’ with my son. The ball that he signed over five years ago sits on a shelf in our living room, and is a great reminder of not only my favorite player but a reminder to live life the ‘right’ way.
I rarely get choked up when celebrities or athletes die. Heck, I rarely get super choked up when family/friends die. But it’s with misty eyes that I type this, knowing that Bob Feller will no longer bring joy and great memories to the baseball fans of Cleveland. I will continue to listen to my recording of Cleveland winning the 48 Series, and watch my tattered VHS copy of the little-known film, “The Kid from Cleveland” that features Bob and other Tribe players from the ’48 team.
My condolences to Bob family and friends in their time of loss. The world was significantly better off with Bob Feller doing his thing, and I will forever be grateful for what Bob did for Cleveland, as well as the US in the Pacific.

Here is a page on Bob Feller from my book “Name the Hall of Famer.” Not only was Mr. Feller a Hall of Fame player, he was a Hall of Famer American.
1. He was born on November 3, 1918.
2. He is the first American Legion ballplayer to reach the Hall of Fame.
3. He was signed as a Major Leaguer while still in high school for one dollar and an autographed baseball.
4. He is last American League pitcher to win 25 games for a team that finished below .500.
5. He was the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter in Yankee Stadium.
6. He is the only Major Leaguer to have five wins at the age of 17.
7. He struck out 15 St. Louis Browns in his first start and struck out 17 Philadelphia Athletics in one game at the age of 17.
8. At the age of 20, his stardom rose when he became the first pitcher to strike out 18 batters in a game.
9. He lost nearly four seasons to the Navy during World War II, earning eight battle stars while in the service.
10. He struck out a career season high 348 batters in 1946, a record for a right-handed pitcher until 1973 when Nolan Ryan surpassed the mark.
11. He pitched three no-hitters during his career, and an American League record 12 one-hitters.
12. During the 1940s, he was considered the fastest pitcher of his era, and once tested his speed against a motorcycle.
13. In 1957, his uniform #19 was the first to be retired by the Indians.
14. His no-hitter on April 16, 1940 against the Detroit Tigers still remains as the only time a no-hitter has been thrown on opening day.
15. ?Rapid Robert? is the winningest pitcher in Cleveland Indians history.

Bob Feller is one of baseball all time immortals.
Not only for his 18 seasons with the same team, but for his committment to the game even after he pull his lceats off the last time.
I got to meet Feller a few times at MLB Alumni events down in Florida and always found myself tongue-tied every time I talked to this living legend of the game.
I was saddened two weeks ago to learn of his transfer from the Cleveland Clinic to a local hospice site in Cleveland. From his late teens to ripe old age of 90 when Feller was one of the starters during the inaugural game of the Baseball Hall of Fame Classic in Cooperstown, New York. Bob Feller was a man who respected the game, was a loving husband and father and is truly one of the immortals of this game.
I can just image Feller up in heaven pushing Cy Young off the mound so he could throw hard again. God Bless you “Bullet Bob”.

Rays Renegade

http://raysrenegade.mlblogs.com

I was born after Bob Feller retired, and only heard about him through being an Indians fan. It seemed like science fiction that the bad Indians teams of the 70s and 80s had had such a great history and great player. He inspired me when I heard him reminiscing as a guest on the radio play-by-play. Though his on the field records are amazing, I was most impressed by his character. I will keep his memory alive by telling the next generation about him, his work ethic and most of all his values.

My family and I met Bob Feller many years ago at a baseball card show. He graciously signed two baseballs (at no charge) for my two young sons. Although the line was long, he took time to talk to my sons. We all thought he was a wonderful person and an excellent representative of the Cleveland Indians! He will be missed.

Bob Feller: As a young boy in Cleveland he personified what a ball player was. Like many of my uncles, joining the Navy in his prime, during the war. In the 1948 season that pitching staff led by the fast baller was just a phenom. I had moved to Virginia by then, but Bobby Feller was still on the mound for Cleveland. He was and is my idea of what a ballplayer should be. A vocal, gentleman to the end. He loved the game.
I got to see him play against the old Senators before his retirement
Rest in peace Mr. Feller. M Beverly

I was invited to a thing at the indians ball park and as i was sitting in the main office in walks Bob Feller and he said hello to all of us and we said hello back but not before my jaw hit the floor,even tho he did not speak to me directly to me it was just a privilage to be in the same room as him. Today we have lost one of great ones. My prayers thoughts go out to his family and close friends. Today we lost a Great one.

I met Bob in 2008 when his Hall of Fame exhibuted at TwinsFest. I had the chance to have him autograph one of his photos – a chance to have a piece of history in my life.

Yet, it wasn’t because he was there or that I have heard of him. He was more than that. Feller was considered the gold standard in starting pitching, especially when his name was tied to Nolan Ryan’s in the 1970s as the then-Angel was racking up No-hitters. I still consider Feller a benchmark in the evolution of the starting pitcher. He will remain so.

God bless you, Bob.

– Randy
http://heirloom.mlblogs.com

Bob Feller will be remembered by indians fans and baseball fans of all generations. May he rest in peace. Name: Kenny K. Hometown:Ohio

So long and see you in the Great League, Mr. Feller

You were great and you knew it,

While you were there, Erie’s South Shore ball club was never one for the cellar.

Your hard, inside pitches troubled and annoyed the best who hit.

You were a hero even for the Greatest Generation,

forgoing a game at the height of a pitcher’s career for a tour of duty overseas,

Instead of beating the Yankees, you served as one.

I hope to catch a listen tonight of some fuzzy reception on a magical a.m. station,

of a renewed great pitcher, starting a new game with the Legends under the lights of the cornfield dynasties.

What a sad day for Indians fans everywhere. Not only was Mr. Feller the greatest Indians pitcher, he was the face of Indians baseball. No matter how things were, you could find him supporting the Tribe, either at Spring Training or at The Jake (Progressive Field). He truly loved this team and the fans.

I had the great experience of meeting Rapid Robert in 2008 in Winter Haven Florida. We weren’t supposed to take pictures with him, but he told me to come on over and have my picture taken with him. He was truly a great gentleman and will forever be remembered in my heart.

Here’s to you “The Heater from Van Meter”. May you rest in peace, Your legacy will never be forgotten. Now you get to play on the big diamond in the sky.

I wrote a book on Bob Feller’s playing contemporary, Cecil Travis, and I sent a copy to his museum hoping to contact him for a possible blurb. One day I was surprised with a message on my voice mail from Mr. Feller. We eventually spoke on the phone, and agreed to provide an endorsement. As is on record, Feller thought that – going by the basis of their statistical records alone – some players from the former Negro League were overrepresented in the HOF. Feller took some heat because of his opinions on this, but a HOFer is of course entitled to his opinion on what players do or don’t belong to join him in the ranks of Cooperstown, and he brought this up when we spoke. He felt that a player like Travis had been unfairly overlooked. I was appreciative for Mr. Feller’s time and to have the words of a Hall of Famer on the cover of my book.

Rob Kirkpatrick

when I was a girl my Dad took me to all the Washington Senator’s games. One night when they were playing Cleveland they set up a wooden frame to test the speed of Bob Fellers fast ball. The first time he hit the frame so hard they had to set it up again. The second time he went right through, but I do not remember the speed. Maybe someone else was there and will remember.
By outfieldfm@comcast.net Dec.16, 2010

The Cleveland Indians have lost a great man. Bob Feller stood for the values we all hope our children will strive to attain. I was lucky to meet and speak with Mr. Feller, but too young to watch him play. My son who loves the Indians as I do will always remember the time he spent meeting in in Goodyear in 2009. Rest in Peace number 19.

Bob Feller! In 92 years of life, he was a perfect example of how a person should live his life. People use Derrick Jeter as a example of a person that kid’s should mirror themselves after. I agree! But Bob Feller did that his hole life. Being a Cleveland Indian for a few years I had the pleasure of meeting and talking with this great man. From then on I was a life long fan. The dedication he showed to this great game was astounding. He will be missed.
Bud Anderson

Nine things you didn’t know about Bob Feller … http://bit.ly/ihyVQS

My thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends. Tribe/MLB fans will never forget out Mr. Feller, a true hero.
http://shortrightfield.blogspot.com/

I wanted to extend my condolences to the Feller family and entire Cleveland Indians Ball Club on behalf of The Lou Boudreau Family.

Bob Feller was a much valued team-mate for my Grandfather, but far more importantly..a friend.

His contributions to the Indians 1948 Championship team, were far surpassed by his commitment and numerous contributions over the years, to the Cleveland Indians Ballclub.

He will be missed!

Blain Louis Boudreau
Lou Boudreau’s Grandson

As a boy growing up in the 1950’s near Detroit, I always followed the American League teams and its stars. Bob Feller was a legend to me at the time and for decades to come. You cannot find many other people who represent hard work, dedication to one’s country, love of the game of baseball and also were a gentleman; this was Bob Feller. Imagine the feeling that rushed through me when I met Mr. Feller at Spring Training in 2009. While I stood in line to meet this man I saw how he greeted each fan with the greatest of respect and interest. What a wonderful man and example of how to live one’s life. Thank you Mr. Feller, we will miss you, but we will not forget you. Respectfully, Mike Keebler

Those who know either of us know that my husband Chris and I both have a great love for baseball. Being from Illinois, I have always been a Cubs fan. Being from Ohio, he has always been an Indians fan.

When Chris and I were getting to know each other, he told me all about Bob Feller. That Bob Feller is the only Chief in the Baseball Hall of Fame. He played his entire career with the Cleveland Indians. Bob Feller was one of the best pitchers that ever lived. He played his first season of baseball for Cleveland at the age of 17. Some say that he threw a 100 mile fast ball, but no one could prove it because radar didn’t exist in 1936. He threw his first no hitter in 1940. He left it all to enlist in the Navy two days after Pearl Harbor. He wasn’t satisfied with his assignment as a Physical Training Instructor, so he applied for Gunnery School. He spent the last 3 years of his Naval service as a gun-captain on a 40-mm antiaircraft mount that had a crew of 24 aboard the USS Alabama. He returned to baseball in 1945 after his Naval service. He pitched another no hitter against the White Sox on Opening Day in 1946. To date, he is the only pitcher to have done that. He went on to pitch his 3rd no hitter in 1951. That’s right, 11 years and one war later he pitched another no hitter. Chris considered Chief Bob Feller a legend, as did every other Ohioan.

Before Chris went on Cruise in 2008, I managed to remove his framed photo of Bob Feller from the house. I wanted to send it Chief Feller?s Baseball Museum in Van Meter, Iowa because I had read that for a $45 donation to the baseball museum Chief Feller would sign a photo. So, I sent in the photo, a check for $45, along with a letter to Bob to Iowa. I told Chief Feller that Chris was from Ohio too. That he played baseball and pitched until he was 19 and went off to the Navy. I told him that Chris was a Chief as well. I told him that a great portion of Chris? Charge Book was about Chief Bob Feller.

Not long after that I received a package from Van Meter, Iowa. It contained Chris’ photo of Bob that I had sent in. Along the top of the photo it said “To Chris” along the bottom it said “Best Wishes- Bob Feller”. It also contained my check. Bob Feller had returned my check.

The package another gem of a gift. Chief Feller had sent his classic high kick pitching style photo. He inscribed it with ?To Chief Chris Shuster- A safe return from haze gray and underway. Chief Bob Feller?. Chief Feller not only returned my check, and a dedication on the photo that I sent him, but he sent Chris something very personal. This legend of a man, a hero to my husband, took the time to tell him something from one Chief to another. That simple gesture superseded his every accomplishment in baseball and made it abundantly clear to me that a brotherhood is a brotherhood and does not require a $45 check.

In 1946, Bob Feller took the mound at Cleveland stadium against the Detroit Tigers for the first time after serving in the Pacific for four years. My father said the sound of the stadium before Feller threw the first pitch was unlike anything he had ever heard, and has never heard since. When that first pitch pierced the strike zone the crowd went wild for a promounced ten minutes. 82,000 plus fans erupting in a thunderous cheer for a true American hero that could have been heard on the moon from what my father told me. Thank you God for Bob Feller for so many reasons, the great competitor, the recounting of baseball history pitch by pitch, and the example he set. RIP Rapid Robert. I’ll bet Willaims and Dimaggio aren’t too glad to see you though!

Bob Feller did what he felt was right every time. There are no scandalous stories to plague his record. No rumors of drug use, betting, etc. to tarnish his legend. He was a great baseball player who gave it everything, and who always did what he thought was right. His career was never interrupted by a suspension, or by suspicion, only by service to his country.

I grew up hearing of Bob Feller from my Dad who is retired from the Navy and was in WWII, My Dad told me a story of attending a game in Yankee stadium and watching Bob Feller pitch a no hitter. I joined the Navy and have retired from the Navy myself. We are die hard Red Soxs fans but I am a huge baseball fan I proudly display a signed 8×10 of Bob Feller and a signed baseball from him. RIP my thoughts and prayers to his family.

Over the years my wife & I have had the great pleasure & honor on several occasions to speak briefly with Mr. Feller as well as witness his elequent midwestern ideals. Always the patriot, his motivational talks & WW2 heroism (although he INSISTED the only heros were those who did not return) found a place in our hearts. We will find the annual HOF induction(s)& Father’s Day baseball in Cooperstown to be a bit less exciting from now on but Mr. Feller’s contributions will not be forgotton. During an interview a couple of years ago he was asked what inscription or rememberence he would expect on his head stone when he passed. His reply was “a good American who played baseball”. That quote is engraved on a baseball bat I am so proud to have & it has been autographed, in person, Robert William Andrew Feller. A definite highlight of my collection. Our respect & admiration for Bob Feller will carry on as part of America’s heritage. Respectfully, Ron & Jean

All of baseball mourn the passing of Bob Feller. A member of our baseball family passed away.
God bless you Mr. Feller. My deepest condolences to all.
Emma
http://crzblue.mlblogs.com

I never had the oppurtunity to meet “The Heater from Van Meeter”, but he’s the reason I became an Indians fan..Perhaps one of the most overlooked player of our time.. Truely a sad, sad day..

I had the privelege of meeting Mr. Feller a few times over the years….and one instance I actually brought him a cup of coffee at his request and he sat and talked about WWII for several minutes. You could tell in his eyes that his love for our country was genuine and incredible! He was a terrific pitcher, one of the greats of all time, but I will remember that meeting and what an AWESEOME man he was to everyone!! Thank you Mr. Feller for your service to our country!!!! You will be missed, and that memory will remain with me forever!!!

I was lucky enough to see this “Hall of Famer” hurl – against the Browns at old Sportsman park in St. Louis.
No doubt most there in attendance were there to see him throw his famed fast ball which he did as he mowed down the lowly Browns. I believe he threw a 2 or 3 hit shut out at the time while striking out so many that it became laughable. Satchel Paige was called in late in the game for the Browns just to make an appearance. Satch was so good at that too with his “Worley Bird” wind up, he actually struck out 2 of the 3 Indians that he faced. I believe the Indians won by a score of 9 – 0. By the way, I think the ticket price was below a dollar and a person could sit just about anywhere he wanted for a Browns game because usually there were not many there. It was always different when the Red Birds came in – you had an assigned seat and the attendance was 10 fold what the Brownies could bring in. Great memories! R.I.P, Bob Feller!

I met Bob Feller in Cooperstown this past summer with my two sons. He saw my 9 yr old boy and yelled out to him “How are you young man?”. He shook hands, looked you in the eye and raved about his time in the Navy. Even at 92 had amazing spirit. We swapped a couple of war stories from WWII, then had to move in. In a 5 minute span he left an immense impression on me and my family. Not just baseball, but the world has lost a real person. Thanks for being who you were. We are all better for it.

Rest in peace, Bullet Bob!!!

My son Zach and I were fortunate enough to go to spring training in Winter Haven on several occasions. Each time Mr. Feller was there signing autographs and taking time with the fans.
He signed a photo for my son and a ball for me plus another photo for a gentlemen that I worked with who was a huge Indians fan and a former Navy man like Mr. Feller.
Even though it may have gotten tedious for him, Mr. Feller took the time to interact with each fan, no matter how long it took to answer their questions, pose for photos and sign autographs.
My son and I also made a point of visiting his museum last summer as we drove from California to Ohio to take him to Hiram College.
The museum is small in size, but huge in history and every Indians fan should try to go someday. It is very easy to find off of I-80 in VanMeter.
Mr. Feller will never get the credit he deserves for being one of the greatest pitchers of all-time. As Indians fans we are lucky to have had him wear Chief Wahoo on his uniform.
Rest in peace Mr. Feller.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I was absolutely fortunate to see Bob pitch in a Cracker Jack “old timers game, it was the best game in Washington at the time, a full stadium!! I wanted to meet Bob at card signings for a long time & missed him, by a sheer blessing, I was at a Memorial Day parade years later in Washington. I heard someone say Mr. Feller before the parade started, & turned to see Bob Feller in a convertible a few feet from me. I set my camera on the tripod in the middle of the street, & as Bob passed he saw me taking his picture & saluted me & I saluted him back!! What a Blessing from THE GREAT LORD GOD!!

Bob Feller, Farm boy, 17 year old major league Pitcher, Patriot, WWII Combat Veteran, Unselfish American.

I met Bob Feller in the 1980’s, when he used to do the Century 21 Real Estate sponsored youth baseball clinics. He always had time for anyone who wanted to talk baseball. I didn’t even think to ask him for his autograph. Years later I did get it – on a grocery bag when my daughter was an Ashland University student and “ran” into Bob at a promotion for a local chain. I will always cherish this simple gesture he afforded her. I hope the Indians will re-think their game uniform selections and introduce perhaps, in his memory, a retro early ’50’s one that “Rapid Robert” and the team wore the last game he played – Chief Wahoo circled by the Cleveland “C” cap and pinstriped jersey and pants.

I had the pleasure of meeting Mr Feller on two occassions. Once at Spring Training in Tucson (1984) and again in the early 90’s when he was doing a tour of military bases in Germany. He was kind enough to pose for a picture with my young son in Arizona and talked baseball with me and my two young sons while at the autograph session in Germany. A true gentleman and military hero. Baseball has not lost one of it’s all time great players, but also one of it’s greatest ambassadors of our national pastime. My condolences to his family. May he rest in peace.

My boyhood hero. I named a son after him. He was the best.

He gave great credit to MLB by not being a guy who went into the service and hid in the motor pool – he evidently faced enemy fire or those medals wouldn’t be there.
From what I’ve read he is only one of three guys who were major leaguers who never played in the minors, at least as of a few years ago. The others were Al Kaline, another great individual, and I believe Dave Winfield.
Saw Feller pitch about 1950 against the St. Louis Browns, a guy named Arft hit a homer from the Browns, and Feller lost 4 – 0. Won a lot more than he lost. He’s one of the few ballplayers where I recall specifically what he did from so long ago. Also he pitched in a game, maybe the only one, where the opposing hitters all had the same batting average after the game as they did at the start of the game. That was of course his opeining day no hitter. Articles said it was 1940, thought it was 1946 and Bob Lemon in center made a catch to save the no hitter. Bob Feller was a great credit to the game.

Mr. Feller was a class act, what you would want modern day athletes to be like. I met him on a couple of occassions and he was gracious both times. The first time I met him was at the Cleveland airport. He dropped his bags shook my hand and I thanked him for his service to our country, and his time with the Indians. We will never see the likes of his loyalty to Cleveland or the Indians again. Even though he may be gone he is and will not be forgotten by this Indians fan. May you rest in peace Rapid Robert.

I’ve never cried so much for the loss of someone I barely knew. My father’s semi-pro team played an exhibition against Mr. Feller’s team back in 1951. My dad’s team lost 3-1 and I’m proud to say that although my dad’s team only got 3 hits off Mr. Feller, my dad had two of them. Then in 1979, as a little boy, my dad took me to see Mr. Feller throw in between a double header for the AAA Denver Bears. I got to meet Mr. Feller and he really made an impression on me and my life. Three men I admire most: Bob Feller, Stan Musial, and my father. He was a war hero and baseball hero. I will miss Mr. Feller but always remember him.

I’ll always remember the day it was announced that Bob
was getting out of he Navy and returning to the Indians.
I was 13 and excited, think that getting Feller back would
be a huge boost for the Tribe. It was…he led them to their
first World Series since 1920 in 1948.

In the late 50s, the Indians gave out a booklet about Feller’s life and career at a game. Several years ago I
got Bob to autograph that booklet when he toured the
N.E. Ohio Drug Mart stores. I wonder how many of those
little green booklets still exist and how many of them are
autographed by the great fireballer (who also had the
biggest curve ball I ever saw). RIP Bob, a true American
hero.

I’ll always remember the day it was announced that Bob
was getting out of he Navy and returning to the Indians.
I was 13 and excited, think that getting Feller back would
be a huge boost for the Tribe. It was…he led them to their
first World Series since 1920 in 1948.

In the late 50s, the Indians gave out a booklet about Feller’s life and career at a game. Several years ago I
got Bob to autograph that booklet when he toured the
N.E. Ohio Drug Mart stores. I wonder how many of those
little green booklets still exist and how many of them are
autographed by the great fireballer (who also had the
biggest curve ball I ever saw). RIP Bob, a true American
hero.

My father was a huge baseball fan, and my mother and my aunts and uncles grew up near Van Meter so as an Iowan and a veteran, I admire Mr. Feller highly. However, the neatest memory for myself and my son, is that one day while visiting the museum at Van Meter, which we do often, Mr. Feller stepped out shook our hands and visited with us, giving my son pointers and encouragement. In a day where atheletes are so self absorbed, I found this nice and refreshing. Mr. Feller, while opinionated and never afraid to call out ball players for misrepresenting the game, always gave back. I will treasure that memory as long as I live. My condolences and prayers to the Feller family as they grieve the loss of a great ballplayer, American, and human being.

Did you know that Bob was interested in old farm machinery? He would occasionally visit a farm near Moore, Montana just to look at the Caterpillar machinery collection. Doing his many baseball related activities, he would take a 100 mile detour for some personal time. I first met Bob at Hi Corbett in Tucson in 1989. Met him various times after that. He always took time out for the fans. A great promoter of baseball. It is regrettable that most of us never saw him pitch live in the 40s and 50s. He was a bridge between decades for anyone who had time to talk with him. Rest in Peace.

Two stories come to mind when I think of Bob Feller.

The first reflects his sense of humor. Rapid Robert threw out the “opening dice” at the 1981 All-Star Game in Cleveland. It wasn’t a real game — it was a Strat-O-Matic game, since the real one was canceled by the players’ strike. They set up a table at home plate in old Municipal Stadium and played them game right there.

The other is personal. As a former sports reporter for the Houston Post, I had access to Bob’s home phone number. Some of my colleagues apparently scammed me and said that Feller had called me and wanted me to return his call. So I did. Bob said, “Just a moment. I want to pour myself a glass of milk.” He came back to the phone. When it was apparent it was a misunderstanding, Bob wasn’t upset at all. “It’s your dime,” he said. The word “hero” is overused, but I would just say Bob was a model American who worked hard, served his country, and remained humble about his many achievements.

Bob Feller was a true Clevelander and a American Hero! Bob Feller will never be forgotten, Bob Feller introduced my great uncle to a Philadephia Phillies scout and began his major league carreer as a Whiz Kid. They both met each other in the Navy.. Bob Feller remained loyal to the city he played for, always a Cleveland Indian! Bob Feller is diffinately one of a kind….We’ll miss him, but memories will remain..

It would only be fitting and proper for the Indians to dedicate the upcoming season in Bob Feller’s honor. He was not only the greatest Indian of all time, but more importantly, an unselfish American hero who gave up baseball for nearly four years in his prime. Rapid Robert is an American Icon.

During Spring Training in Winter Haven a few years ago my wife, son, father-in-law and I met Bob Feller following a game. We spotted him as we turned out of the third base stands. He looked tired and it appeared he had just fended off some rather unruly teenagers who were being rude in requesting an autograph. My son, who was 4 at the time had been hoping to get an autograph from a “real” baseball player… those were his words. His eyes lit up when he saw Mr. Feller in his uniform. Seeing that Mr. Feller had just been bothered by the teenagers I whispered to my son that maybe another time would be better. From nearly 80 feet away Mr. Feller somehow heard me and looked right at my son. Mr. Feller exclaimed, “I would love to sign a ball for that young man!” Mr. Feller did sign my son’s baseball and my son unprovoked said, “Thank You Sir.” Mr. Feller then said he was glad to see a young couple doing such a great job raising their son to be grateful and respectful. We spoke very briefly and I thanked him several more times. My son had his autograph from a “real” baseball player and I had received an amazing compliment from an amazing American Hero. Thank You Mr. Feller. Go Tribe!

God bless Rapid Robert. You taught generations about loyalty, grace and dedication. Some of todays athletes should take notice. A true professional in every sense of the word.

I feel that a big hunk of my baseball world has been taken away. Being a fellow Iowan, I picked the Indians as ‘my’
team in 1947 at age eleven. My son and I remain true blue.
Thank you, Bob Feller, for being a part of my life. I still think
that you were robbed of that ’48 Series game!

I was able to meet Bob Feller back in September before a Tribe game I went to. He came up to me and introduced himself and I shook his hand. It is a moment I will never forget for the rest of my life! To think I met someone who my grandfather watched back in the old days is pretty amazing ( I am only 22 years old). Bob Feller will not be forgotten & he will live on in our hearts!

Unfortunetly, he was before my time so I never had the privledge to watch him play. But loving baseball, I appreciate everything he did for the sport and for our country. I was able to visit his musem in Van Meter this summer, and I highly recommend it if you’re in the area.
–Mike
‘Minoring In Baseball’
http://burrilltalksbaseball.mlblogs.com/archives/2010/05/2010-baseball-trip-day-2-van-meter-ia.html

Opening Day should be renamed as Bob Feller day from now on!

That is the best tribute we can make to this great American and Cleveland Indian super star!

He is an example to us all and the antithesis to those athletes, who shall remain nameless, who think it is all about their greed and ego.

I am just young enough that I did not see Feller pitch. However, I started going to spring training in 2006. I obtained his autograph in Winter Haven that year. He was gracious to me and all others that I saw. In fact, when I asked him to sign one to my father using my dad’s childhood nickname, he made a mistake on the picture. He caught it, told his companion to get another picutre, and he did it again. We had a very polite conversation while he waited for his companion to get the next picture.

Progressive Field needs to be renaimed FELLER FIELD in his honor. It’s the right thing to do. Bob Feller is the ONLY true Cleveland sports legend. PERIOD!

I had the privilege of meeting this wonderful man on April 24, 2010 at the Bob Feller Museum in Van Meter. Also on hand were Doug Harvey, Eddie Robinson, and Earl Weaver. I bought a membership to his museum (which I will continue to renew) specifically to meet Mr. Feller. I took my 2 year old daughter to the museum. When my turn to meet Mr. Feller came up, he began the conversation by asking where I was from. I told him I was from Bismarck, North Dakota. Mr. Feller lit up and mentioned that he signed his first professional contract with Fargo-Moorhead (an Indian’s Farm Club) in 1935. Mr. Feller also mentioned he was in Bismarck years back for the American Legion World Series. Mr. Feller told me he attended the American Legion World Series every year, and that he was the very first inductee into the American Legion Baseball Hall of Fame. He signed two baseballs for me, and was very gracious. He also posed for a photo with me and my daughter. He held my daughter’s hand in the photo. I was so impressed by the hospitality this great man displayed for my daughter and I. After my meeting with Mr. Feller, I was approached by a Feller biographer attending the session with Bob who asked me several questions about my trip from North Dakota to Van Meter, Iowa. I told him I wanted to meet Bob Feller, and that was the sole basis for my trip. He was very impressed with this and took my name. Several photos including one of my daughter sleeping on my shoulder were posted on the event gallery of the Bob Feller Museum’s website. This great man has left a profound memory in my life. One which I will pass on to my daughter who attended this event with me. Thank you Bob Feller for your kindness, hospitality, warmth, and patriotism to your fans, your sport, and your country. You will never be forgotten! Rest in Peace Bob Feller, a TRUE American Hero!

My husband and I met Mr. Feller and his wife at the Hampton Inn in Winterhaven several year ago during spring training. He sat down and had a snack with us and several others and we all talked for quite some time. He was a wonderful person, baseball player and American hero. As others have stated, I hope the Indians do something to honor him during the 2011 season-maybe all players wear his number on their jerseys?
RIP Mr. Feller. You will be missed!

I too, am an Iowan, and have met Bob many times over the years, starting when I was in high school in the 70’s. Bob was speaking at a baseball clinic at a local high school along with Hal Trosky. and Ted Williams. I remember Bob speaking to me and my father offering tips on pitching. I vividly recall telling me not to use weights and go swimming during the baseball season to preserve my arm.
Many years later he was at a function at the Field of Dreams, and someone mentioned Joe DiMaggio, and how did Bob fare against him. Bob said they had some great matchups, and he was very difficult to strike out. He was one of the toughest outs, alongside Taffy Wright. Very quick bats. He did say the guy that gave DiMaggio fits was Satchel Paige. He said DiMag was only 1 for 27 or something ,as my memory recalls , against Paige. I truly relished his recall of players of old, their skills and tendencies, and rattle it off like he played against them just last week. This is truly an end of an era. God Bless You, Bob.

My daughter and I met Bob Feller at an opening of CVS corner of State and Pleasant Valley. He was so great and we got his autograh.

We will never ever forget Bob Feller.

He was probably the Indian’s greatested pitcher.

My daughter and I met Bob Feller at an opening of CVS corner of State and Pleasant Valley. He was so great and we got his autograh.

We will never ever forget Bob Feller.

He was probably the Indian’s greatested pitcher.

Bob Feller was an approachable hero. Like so many others, I had the temendous honor & privelege to meet him at a spring training game. He was amazingly easy to talk to and I will cherish that moment forever. One of the great things is, he was a Cleveland Indian through and through, He was loyal and loved the Indians as much as we did. They don’t make ’em like that anymore. We’ll never forget you, rest in peace, Rapid Robert.

I never meet Bob personally but he has always been my favorite. My husband and I were in Florida when he had
a heart attack, My daughter rushed to the airport to come
to Florida and she was on stand by. She sat down and
sitting next to her was Bob as he was going to Florida
too. She started to cry as she thought she would not
get on that flight and Bob started to console her. He talked to her while they waited. When they started to fill the plane she did make it and as Bob got on he went to her and said
he was so glad she made it on the plane and everything
would be okay. She was so impressed with him and I
told her now you know why I liked him so much.

I met Mr.Feller In the Early 70’s after my return from Vietnam.I was in my Marine Corps uniform and he noticed my 2 purple heart ribbons.he stuck out his hand and said “I would like to shake the hand of a hero” BOB FELLER THOUGHT I WAS A HERO??Knowing of his fine military career I said “no sir it is you and millions like you that are the TRUE heroes” Even though you were Navy Bob, SEMPER FI, CARRY ON

Our loss can not be overstated, the Indians Organization has lost its heart and soul, you will be missed Mr. Feller.

I met Bob Feller about 9 years ago at a little antique shop in downtown Willoughby. I was with my little granddaughter, Kiley at the time. I was pushing her in her stroller and he began talking with us. He was very friendly and informative. You could tell he loved the game of baseball more than anything and was very proud to have played for the Cleveland Indians and to still be associated with such a great franchise. He autographed a picture for me and I had it on my desk at work the day after he passed away. What a wonderful man!! He will surely be missed!! R.I.P Bob Feller.

It’s very difficult to express in words one’s “ideals.” When I reflect upon the life and career of Bob Feller it brings to mind the thought that there was once a time in our country when character still mattered; and, Bob Feller was the very essence of “character.” He lived by example-not attitude or overt pride.
He was a master of his art–no one can doubt his superior abilities, and at a critical time in our nation’s history–he–as a young man, and without hesitation, put his country first, and his career and fame aside. It was, I think, exactly what one would have “expected” of Bob Feller. I can tell you that regardless of the trends, or fashion of the times or what’s “in” or “out”– the example of Mr. Feller will never be outdated! He was a plainspoken man of truth and grace, and I’m confident that he’s “safe at home”–in Heaven–right now. God Bless his memory; well done Bob!

I count myself very lucky to be able to say i’ve seen Bob throw out the first pitch at an Opening Day. My thoughts and prayers are with the Feller family.

I remember taking my two older sons especially in 1993 when we had weekend season tickets at the old stadium. Many times Bob would drive or walk up and not only sign autographs but would spend time talking to us.
Each time we meet him we felt honor to meet him and I even remember that he got to the point that he would remember seeing us the previous weekend.
He was a great ambassador for the Inidians and baseball and will be missed.

I became a true fan of Bob Feller when I was in the 4th grade, and because of him I really started following the Indians.
During the mid fifties, I attended Gilmore Day Camp. Bob Feller would take the time to come out to speak and give us boys his autograph. I never forgot this kindness.
In later years, I would see and speak to him at the Gates Mills 4th of July parade. He was always a gentleman. He was always a true and gracious Clevelander. They don’t make them like him anymore!

Bob Feller was and will always be a true American hero. The best way to honor his memory would be to rename the home of the Tribe to.. Bob Feller Park at Progressive Field. We may never have another like him. God bless Rapid Robert !

My condolences to the Feller family. While I never met the great gentleman, I grew up outside Cleveland and heard many a story of his greatness-not only on, but off the field. I have been gone from Cleveland for 40 years now and am still in awe of him. I only wish I’d known he was at the Goodyear park as I’d have gladly travelled to the west side of Phoenix to have met him. Sadly, we will all miss his class and grace. Rest in peace, Rapid Robert.

This is from my Mundy’s Thursday blog at http://www.the-press-news.com, where I also have photos of him at spring training.

Mr. Feller was a wonderful person and I wanted to do some type of tribute to him.

By KAREN MUNDY
The Press-News
Bob Feller died on Dec. 15, 2010, at 92 years old. With his passing, Cleveland lost probably its most well known and loyal sports hero. Of even more importance, though, the country lost a great patriot.
I was fortunate enough to meet Bob Feller a few years ago when I traveled to spring training in Florida with my sister-in-law, Dr. Arlene Marx. We had the opportunity to travel to Florida two different years for opening day of spring training, but Mr. Feller never missed an opening day. He was always there greeting fans, signing autographs, encouraging the players and, of course, throwing out the first pitch. When the Indians moved spring training to Arizona he planned to be there as well.
As any Cleveland Indians fan knows, Bob was also often seen in Cleveland. He came to play for the Indians when he was just 17 years old (before he even graduated from high school), and he never really left? except for the time he spent servng in the military. With the disloyalty and egotism we too often see in athletes at this time, I wish Lebron and a few others would have had a long talk with this man. Bob would have told them all about what it was like starting out as a teenage superstar. Hopefully, his humility would allow him to add that he tried to never forget his family, friends, country and fans.
I will not regret the few minutes I was able to spend talking to ?the Heater from Van Meter,? as he had been nicknamed. We had missed meeting him a couple years before during our first trip to spring training. The line for autographs was so long, we opted to sit down and see the start of the game? hoping that we could come back later and get an autograph. However, we missed that autograph session.
The next trip, Arlene and I made it a priority to wait in line and get an autograph. Believe me, it was a wait. Mr. Feller liked to talk and spend time with all his fans. He would answer questions, pose for photos, give advice and make everyone feel as if they were his closest friends. Rodger Henderson, a native of East Canton, worked at the ballpark and had begun to help set up those autograph sessions each year. Rodger told me how much he admired the man who had become not just his hero, but his friend. He talked about how ?Bob? took time with everyone and even when Rodger advised him to close the autograph sessions, he would often come back and find him talking to someone else.
When I had the opportunity to talk to Bob at spring training, I asked him to give me some advice for my son, who played sports. In his down-to-earth way of talking, he merely said ?tell him to work hard and throw strikes.?
At home, I have an autographed copy of his book titled ?Bob Feller?s Little Black Book of Baseball Wisdom? laying on a table next to my computer desk. As the title suggests, the book is definitely filled with words of wisdom, but not just about baseball. He also wrote about the ?importance of manual labor,? ?family values, ? ?America?s real heroes? and much more. Furthermore, he told of other positive influences in his life such as his father ?who built him (the original) field of dreams,? Babe Ruth, Larry Doby, Jackie Robinson and Cy Young.
Also known as ?Rapid Robert,? Feller retired in 1956, with 256 wins, 2,581 strikeouts, 44 shutouts, three no-hitters and 12 one-hitters. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, the first time he was nominated.
As great as all of those statistics sound, they could have been even greater had he not interrupted his career to serve in the United States Navy for 44 months. However, to Feller, it was not an interruption; it was his duty as an American to enlist and fight for freedom during World War II. While in the Navy, he served on the USS Alabama and received six battle citations for his bravery.
Our young people need more role models like Bob Feller. He gave his all whether he was out on the mound ?throwing the heat,? lifting bales of hay on the farm in Van Meter, Iowa, fighting for his country as a sailor or greeting baseball fans at the park.
In his book, he has many quotes, but I don?t think any of them better describes how the sports hero lived his life than this one: ?Lost time is never found. You?re put on Earth for a given amount of time, and what you do during the time that the good Lord has given you says much about you. It?s your legacy.?
Thanks, Mr. Feller, for living by that philosophy. On Dec. 15, the ?good Lord? walked out to the mound and took the ball out of your hands. Will He ever find ?a relief pitcher? who can step up? in the same way that you have for 92 years?
All we can do is hope.

I bawled when I heard the news. I lived in Ames, just 40 miles from his museum, for several years. My sons and I attended several autograph sessions over the years there and met Bob at other events in the Des Moines area. My oldest son’s middle name is Robert after him, My next son’s middle name is Crosley after the old Cincinnati fileld, and my daughter is Anderson Rose after Sparky and Pete, 2 of my favorite Reds. Losing Sparky, then Bob, and now Harmon Killebrew battling cancer it’s been a tough year fro baseball. Losing so many of these truly great men and being left behind with overpaid, drug using cheaters just doesn’t seem fair.
Anyway, as everyone here has stated Bob never said no, especially to kids. He gave mt oldest son so many pointers on pitching and shared more great stories than we could remember. It’s one thing for a 13 year old boy like mine to read these stories, or hear them from me because I saw an interview or something, but to hear them from the people who lived them firsthand was a once in a lifetime experience.
Good bye Bob. This summer when the whole family is in Dyersville at the Field of Dreams, I’ll keep an eye out for you on the mound and Sparky on the bench barking out orders.
We Love you Bob.
R.I.P.

I met Bob at the Grand Opening of the Spring Training Facility in Goodyear, Arizona. Knowing a relative of mine is in the Hall of Fame, and played a few years overlapping Bob, I inquired if he knew of him. When I mentioned Joseph Floyd “Arky” Vaughan’s name, Bob’s eyes lit up. Bob talked several minutes on how he had pitched to Arky, and that he and the Veterans Committee were able to get him nominated and entered into the Hall of Fame. Our family had vague knowledge of Arky, but thanks to Bob, we now have a much better understanding of who Arky was, and the impact he had on the game, and of course, Bob. I now work for the Indians during Spring Training, and during the first two years in Goodyear, Bob would go out of his way to make sure he said hello or sat down next to me during meal time. Last year Bob and his Son Steve continued to make time for me, and for that I will be forever grateful. Thanks for the memories .

I had the opportunity to meet Mr. Feller on several occasions, and enjoyed every conversation I had with him. He was always willing to talk to anyone and everyone about baseball.
Baseball lost one of its best ambassadors.
Rest in peace, sir. Condolences to family and friends.

Last year at Indians spring training they announced that Bob Feller was signing autographs at the game. My 11 year old son immediately screamed “Bob Feller’s here! We need to go see him now!” He was a legend.

The next morning Mr. Feller showed up at Indians practice and spent some time talking with my son. He listened to my son, talked with him, treated him with respect. He was a gentleman.

God bless you Bob. My son will forever remember the time you took to share with a young baseball and Indians fan and will forever treasure the signed Indians had you gave him. Click here for a photo

An older neighbor friend took me to the corner market to buy baseball cards. He asked who was my favorite team. Being only six years old, I didn’t have one. As we opened our cards(5 cents) I had a Bob Feller card. My freind said he is pretty good. That was 1953. I became an Indian fan because of that baseball card. I got to meet Mr Feller in the late 80’s when he visited the USA team in Millington, TN. The Indians are an important part of my summers. We try to see them play some each year Inter league game give us a chance to travel from Memphis. I got to see game one of the 95 series in Atlanta. What a thrill. Thank so much to the Tribe, and especially you Mr. Feller.

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